“Curriculum: Foundations, Principles, and Issues”: Reflection

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The paragraph offered for analysis tells the reader about key points to consider when designing a curriculum. First and foremost, the section focuses on the question of whether learning facilitates or hinders education. The author argues that today’s learning system impedes the younger generation’s education. Further on, the text of the paragraph will explain the thought laid down in the introduction of various concepts and notions.

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The description of different approaches to the formation of the curriculum follows. The text highlights two main ones – the technical-scientific approach and the nontechnical approach. The main feature of the technical-scientific approach is that it is based on a clear scheme of construction of the curriculum, developed based on data analysis. “The technical-scientific approach to curriculum development suggests that the process of curriculum development is highly objective, universal, and logical” (Ornstein & Hunkins, 2018). This approach does not consider the interpersonal aspect of the student-teacher relationship. It does not offer a way of sensory learning based on the emotions and desires of the students themselves. However, it all encompasses a second approach, the nontechnical approach. “In contrast, nontechnical curriculum developers, also known as postmodern or post constructivist, stress the subjective, personal, aesthetic, heuristic, spiritual, social, and transactional” (Ornstein & Hunkins, 2018). This approach suggests that curriculum developers build on the intuitive aspect of learning and allow students to educate themselves.

I believe that for a successful educational process, a curriculum should be something in between one approach and the other. The technical and analytical side is essential for assessing students’ workload levels, calculating their possible performance, and determining quantitative learning goals (Green, 2017). The nontechnical part is also vital for the curriculum because the intuitive approach will help make the learning process as adaptable as possible for students (Cornerstones, 2021). Next, the text discusses the formation of goals and objectives for the curriculum. In this context, the paragraph offers the reader an exciting idea that appropriately describes what is happening in the modern education system. It sounds like this: the goal of modern education is not to produce education as such but to win in competitions (Ornstein & Hunkins, 2018). This can be a competition between teachers, principals, city officials, and even national leaders to present the highest performance to the world.

However, in the pursuit of a high score, programmers forget that the objectives they propose must be actionable, and the learning must be applicable and valuable to the students. The author cites the example of the No Children Left Behind program, which set unrealistic goals and then punished principals for not meeting them (Ornstein & Hunkins, 2018). I am also very close to the idea that modern education provides irrelevant knowledge. “Yet, we have drill and practice sessions on “inert,” “dead” knowledge that will get students through a particular test hurdle” (Ornstein & Hunkins, 2018). This suggests that the programs are designed to meet the plan and win the competition, not to help the students.

The curricula contain tons of unnecessary information that students will forget right after they write the test. Still, an educational program should ensure that students are free to apply what they have learned in everyday life (Ornstein & Hunkins, 2018). In addition, instruction should provide students with knowledge that can be used. To summarize, I believe that the text in this paragraph describes the current educational system very well and offers a new perspective on old problems. This includes the problems of poor-quality curricula, setting unrealistic goals, and forgetting those for whom the curricula are primarily intended.

References

Green, B. (2017). Engaging curriculum: Bridging the curriculum theory and English education divide. Routledge. Web.

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Ornstein, A. C., & Hunkins, F. P. (2018). Curriculum: Foundations, principles, and issues. Pearson Education Limited.

Cornerstones. (2021). How to design your curriculum. Web.

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ChalkyPapers. (2022, September 17). “Curriculum: Foundations, Principles, and Issues”: Reflection. Retrieved from https://chalkypapers.com/curriculum-foundations-principles-and-issues-reflection/

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ChalkyPapers. (2022, September 17). “Curriculum: Foundations, Principles, and Issues”: Reflection. https://chalkypapers.com/curriculum-foundations-principles-and-issues-reflection/

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"“Curriculum: Foundations, Principles, and Issues”: Reflection." ChalkyPapers, 17 Sept. 2022, chalkypapers.com/curriculum-foundations-principles-and-issues-reflection/.

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ChalkyPapers. (2022) '“Curriculum: Foundations, Principles, and Issues”: Reflection'. 17 September.

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ChalkyPapers. 2022. "“Curriculum: Foundations, Principles, and Issues”: Reflection." September 17, 2022. https://chalkypapers.com/curriculum-foundations-principles-and-issues-reflection/.

1. ChalkyPapers. "“Curriculum: Foundations, Principles, and Issues”: Reflection." September 17, 2022. https://chalkypapers.com/curriculum-foundations-principles-and-issues-reflection/.


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ChalkyPapers. "“Curriculum: Foundations, Principles, and Issues”: Reflection." September 17, 2022. https://chalkypapers.com/curriculum-foundations-principles-and-issues-reflection/.