Discussion of Andragogy vs. Pedagogy

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The concept of andragogy refers to methods of education of adults, and pedagogy is about ways of educating children. The first difference between adult and child learning is that children tend to be dependent on their teachers (Walker & Graham, 2021). This means that a teacher is responsible for the learning process of his or her fosterlings and needs to control their knowledge and direct them. In contrast, adults can act independently from a teacher; they do not need to receive grades for homework to stay motivated. Another difference is that children’s life experience is limited. For this reason, adults can understand a topic by themselves, while “children are fully dependent on others for learning and understanding” (Roy & Halder, 2021, p. 116). One more difference is that adults’ motivation is commonly internal, whereas children frequently require external stimulus and support to keep on learning (MacLellan, 2019). From what is stated above, it could be inferred that teachers should approach adults and children differently.

Teachers who take leadership positions should understand that techniques applied for children’s education are not suitable for adults. For example, a teacher who educates schoolchildren should tell them directly what they should do, which exercises they need to complete, and which books to read. In the case of adults, a teacher’s critical purpose is to share knowledge and explain unclear aspects of the topic. It is necessary to assist adults in acquiring the sense that they are gradually improving their skills and understanding.

To proceed into a leadership role, a teacher should master the skills of classroom assessment, grading, and creating an effective curriculum. In addition to that, it is necessary to enhance communication and problem-solving skills. A teacher who wants to become a leader also needs to learn how to find a unique approach to every student, regardless of their age. Finally, it is essential to figure out how to provide a positive personal example to colleagues and students.

References

MacLellan, J., Callary, B., & Young, B. W. (2019). Adult learning principles in master’s sport: A coach’s perspective. Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, 31(1), 31-50.

Roy, S., & Halder, M. K. (2021). Andragogy, its principles and outcomes in higher education. In S. Chakraborty (Ed.) Educational Issues and Challenges (pp. 114-120), Kunal Books.

Walker, S., & Graham, L. (2021). At risk students and teacher-student relationships: student characteristics, attitudes to school and classroom climate. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 25(8), 896-913.

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ChalkyPapers. (2023) 'Discussion of Andragogy vs. Pedagogy'. 6 January.

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ChalkyPapers. 2023. "Discussion of Andragogy vs. Pedagogy." January 6, 2023. https://chalkypapers.com/discussion-of-andragogy-vs-pedagogy/.

1. ChalkyPapers. "Discussion of Andragogy vs. Pedagogy." January 6, 2023. https://chalkypapers.com/discussion-of-andragogy-vs-pedagogy/.


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ChalkyPapers. "Discussion of Andragogy vs. Pedagogy." January 6, 2023. https://chalkypapers.com/discussion-of-andragogy-vs-pedagogy/.