Expectations and Creating Classroom Rules

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Working with young children in class requires elaborate rules that govern behaviors to ensure that only appropriate behaviors are exhibited. For regulations to be effective, they must describe what the teacher wants to see (Hemmeter et al., 2008). The students must also engage in the policymaking process to ensure inclusive regulations. My class has ten policies that govern our daily operations, and the rules are as listed below;

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  1. No littering of the classroom.
  2. No making noise in class.
  3. Do not put anything in your mouth.
  4. Be respectful to everyone.
  5. Be safe, kind, and helpful.
  6. Be smart by helping a friend revise a concept or show them safe places to play.
  7. You should not leave class without permission.
  8. Raise your hand if you want to speak during lessons.
  9. Listen to what the teacher says and do exactly that.
  10. Handle every class material with care to avoid damage.

Rule number one to five must change to be more precise, understandable, memorable, and practical for the children. Number one has to be edited to mean what the teacher expects. Therefore, the rule will change to “Put all the trash in the bin.” The second rule will change to a more elaborate one, such as “No shouting or screaming in class.” Similarly, rule three will be more precise if written like this, “Wash hands regularly to get rid of germs.” Additionally, the fourth policy will translate to “Do not abuse anyone verbally or physically (Hemmeter et al., 2008). Lastly, the fifth rule will have to be elaborated using a high five poster to illustrate how students should practice safety, maintain kindness, and be helpful in school. The other rules meet the standards; therefore, they will not change because they are understandable, practical, and elaborate.

Reference

Hemmeter, M. L., Ostrosky, M. M., Artman, K. M., & Kinder, K. A. (2008). Planning transitions to prevent challenging behavior. Young Children, 19.

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ChalkyPapers. (2022, October 5). Expectations and Creating Classroom Rules. Retrieved from https://chalkypapers.com/expectations-and-creating-classroom-rules/

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ChalkyPapers. (2022, October 5). Expectations and Creating Classroom Rules. https://chalkypapers.com/expectations-and-creating-classroom-rules/

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"Expectations and Creating Classroom Rules." ChalkyPapers, 5 Oct. 2022, chalkypapers.com/expectations-and-creating-classroom-rules/.

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ChalkyPapers. (2022) 'Expectations and Creating Classroom Rules'. 5 October.

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ChalkyPapers. 2022. "Expectations and Creating Classroom Rules." October 5, 2022. https://chalkypapers.com/expectations-and-creating-classroom-rules/.

1. ChalkyPapers. "Expectations and Creating Classroom Rules." October 5, 2022. https://chalkypapers.com/expectations-and-creating-classroom-rules/.


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ChalkyPapers. "Expectations and Creating Classroom Rules." October 5, 2022. https://chalkypapers.com/expectations-and-creating-classroom-rules/.