Sex Education in Schools and in Families

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At the moment, the experts in the field of education disagree on the question of sex education. Some believe, that such a delicate and sensitive matter should be left entirely to family’s management, while others insist on the role school plays in the formation of functioning and mindful individuals. Although the best approach, it appears, is more nuanced than this dichotomy, it is important to outline the direct responsibilities that schools have in the conversation. Firstly, they possess specialized resources to introduce children to the matters of boundaries and consent, in themselves and others (Goldfarb & Lieberman, 2021). Not all families are well versed in delivering such a delicate topic to their young child, while schools are able to present it comprehensively and, in an age,-appropriate manner.

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Secondly, schools are responsible for ensuring children are being educated in accordance to the modern values of freedom and acceptance. As such, inclusivity and variations of human sexuality should, at least to some degree, be taught over the course of school sex education, to counter the conservative approaches in some families. At the same time, parents are in charge of introducing their children to the concept of body autonomy (Pariera & Brody, 2018). Physical, and, by extension, sexual safety of a child is something that only a parent can discuss with them early enough.

The STD education should occur when the basics of the topic have already been discussed, and there is a likelihood of children or teens engaging in sex themselves. It is not particularly important who handles the conversation, but the delicacy and lack of judgement are essential (Goldfarb & Lieberman, 2021). Children must understand that STD is a preventable and curable medical risk, and not a moral failing or an irredeemable stain on their reputation.

References

Pariera, K., & Brody, E. (2018). “Talk More About It”: Emerging Adults’ Attitudes About How and When Parents Should Talk About Sex. Sexuality Research And Social Policy, 15(2), 219-229. Web.

Goldfarb, E., & Lieberman, L. (2021). Three Decades of Research: The Case for Comprehensive Sex Education. Journal Of Adolescent Health, 68(1), 13-27. Web.

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ChalkyPapers. (2022, November 22). Sex Education in Schools and in Families. Retrieved from https://chalkypapers.com/sex-education-in-schools-and-in-families/

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ChalkyPapers. (2022, November 22). Sex Education in Schools and in Families. https://chalkypapers.com/sex-education-in-schools-and-in-families/

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"Sex Education in Schools and in Families." ChalkyPapers, 22 Nov. 2022, chalkypapers.com/sex-education-in-schools-and-in-families/.

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ChalkyPapers. (2022) 'Sex Education in Schools and in Families'. 22 November.

References

ChalkyPapers. 2022. "Sex Education in Schools and in Families." November 22, 2022. https://chalkypapers.com/sex-education-in-schools-and-in-families/.

1. ChalkyPapers. "Sex Education in Schools and in Families." November 22, 2022. https://chalkypapers.com/sex-education-in-schools-and-in-families/.


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ChalkyPapers. "Sex Education in Schools and in Families." November 22, 2022. https://chalkypapers.com/sex-education-in-schools-and-in-families/.